Send us your Haiga

The submission deadline has been extended till the 15th of October. You have time to send us your beautiful work.

Cafe Haiku is looking for good quality haiga

Good haiga brings together a strong haiku or tanka and a visually striking artwork or photograph. The art and the words can complement or contrast or even better, use the link and shift method to form a seamless whole.

Deadline – before the 15th of October 2022

Theme – the seasons. Wherever you are and whatever the season, show us something of your world. Send us upto 5 haiga in jpg format.

Detailed submission guidelines are here on out About page

Here are some links to read up on haiga –

Examples of haiga we previously carried as examples are HERE

Creating haiga article

You could also take a look at the beautiful examples of haiga we have published on our website. HERE

Look forward to seeing your work.

Here are the guidelines –

• Please send in up to five each of your best haiga, either a photo or artwork with haiku, senryu, short haibun, or tanka. It must be original and unpublished work, both the art and the haiku. If either is not by you please include the credit.
• Please send your submissions to ‘inhaikumumbai@gmail.com’ . Include your name as you would like it printed and your country. Jpg is the preffered format.
• We ask only for first publication and non-exclusive anthology rights and the copyright remains yours. You can republish at any time after it is published here but please mention that Cafe Haiku was the first publisher.
• We are looking only for unpublished work which means it is not available anywhere public like your blog or public group such as Instagram. If it is publicly available we consider it published. Please do not send us work submitted or published elsewhere – we do check.
• Every single submission will be read by all the editors and all decisions are taken after discussion by them all.

We thank you again for submitting to us and helping us in our small attempts to popularise all things haikai and make good quality reading available in this field.

CH Showcase – Kashiana Singh

As a warm up to the book launch of our latest anthology, sharing my solitude, we asked those who submitted to write a few words about themselves and their work. The book launch is now fixed for 17 September 2022, Saturday, online on Zoom. Drop us an email at inhaikumumbai@gmail.com and we will send you the link.

This is the last post in the Showcase series. See you at the book launch.

The anthology is available as an ebook on Amazon. Copy this ASIN code B0B59NSWPK into the Amazon of your country to find it.

The haijin we showcase today is Kashiana Singh

Writing and more importantly, reading haikai poetry has helped me aspire to an approach to poetry that arrives in a nurturing way, defined by the tenderness of nature, a sense of community, and an alignment with senses gifted to us by our ancestors. Each of us as creative practitioners desire to be bathed in an inspirational light and to me, haiku has offered the space that brings me light, shade, and shadows in just the right combination. This comes to me in the form of juxtaposition – that intersection of words and empty spaces, or ma.

Technically, this form of writing has helped me refine the art of reduction – peeling the layers of the onion and asking the Why Why Why in order to get to the kernel of my initial thought or aspiration for a poem. Overall, the writing and re-writing process, reading and re-reading process has fostered the student in me. I am ever grateful to Kala Ramesh and her shimmering presence and nurturing of the haikai community for letting me exist, for mentoring the beginner’s mind.

Personally, it has reaffirmed my mantra of Work as Worship – to distill a spiritual experience from being in the presence of your daily rituals; connecting to the larger cosmos is what any type of spiritual engagement strives for and the word of haiku is now another meditative process that I am building into my existence.

I am treading carefully but surely into the world of haiku and each step that I take gathers into me the energy of this creative, investigative practice.

It feels like a homecoming.

sighting rainbows
their shimmering fins
shift in silence

CH Showcase – Sonal Srinivasan

As a warm up to the book launch of our latest anthology, sharing my solitude, we asked those who submitted to write a few words about themselves and their work. The book launch is now fixed for 17 September 2022, Saturday, online on Zoom. Drop us an email at inhaikumumbai@gmail.com and we will send you the link.

The anthology is available as an ebook on Amazon. Copy this ASIN code B0B59NSWPK into the Amazon of your country to find it.

The haijin we showcase today is Sonal Srinivasan

Healing through haiku:


I feel the only way to deal with pain or grief is through it. We have to go through it and come out the other side, feel it, reel in it and go through each wave of the pain over and over if need be. But that doesn’t go to say it is ever easy or simple and no two people experience it the same ever.


This is where poetry comes in and haiku being such a succinct and poignant form, takes you a step closer in fully feeling these waves of pain, and leaves you feeling that much lighter each day, if you will.


So of course, like many of you, I’ve seen close friends lose their loved ones, I’ve lost my grandfather (not to covid) but it was a huge loss. I lost my second fur baby in a matter of days and it left me shattered and has had me sinking real deep and going into an abyss. If it wasn’t for haiku, I really don’t think I would have made it as the grief is that deep. So more than in the happy times, in times of strife is when haiku has been my true Savior! When I’ve been at the brink of heightened grief, when nothing else has worked, when the tears won’t stop, be it that I’m crying for myself or for someone I love, when nothing makes me feel whole or happy I turn to writing haiku and something shifts, however slightly, but it does and gives me the strength to cope with the next day. Haiku helps acceptance to set in and allows free expression and this is where the Healing begins and the light enters through the cracks, through the parts where we are broken. Haiku is also like a subtle reminder to me, to notice the little joys and the fleeting moments of beauty that would otherwise go unnoticed. I am eternally grateful to have been introduced to this beautiful form of poetry.

CH Showcase – Lakshmi Iyer

As a warm up to the book launch of our latest anthology, sharing my solitude, we asked those who submitted to write a few words about themselves and their work. The book launch is now fixed for 17 September 2022, Saturday.

The anthology is available as an ebook on Amazon. Copy this ASIN code B0B59NSWPK into the Amazon of your country to find it.

The haijin we showcase today is Lakshmi Iyer

Poetry is when an emotion has found its thought and the thought has found words.

Robert Frost

It has been a long time since I have joined this phenomenon called the Haikai and very interestingly, I have realized the depth and the indulgence of the cosmic space around me. An experience in few words, zooming in to zooming out, a microcosm of a larger feeling, the taste of all the five elements in just 17 syllables….isn’t it a wonder of wonders! I started to realise that it brought out a discipline of evoking the reader to recreate the captured moment in one snapshot. And also that i could celebrate haikai in all forms of its beauty. I could relate my thoughts juxtaposing with seasons, plants, animals, mindset and an awakening within. It in fact aroused my spiritual journey with reference to mind, body and soul. A sincere effort and in the process learning the art of tanka, haibun, tanka prose, gembun, rengay, renku.

Learning haikai and putting into practice is a challenge. Getting into journals has always been secondary. I owe my learning to Kala Ramesh and to all the senior haijins who have brought a transformation in my perspectives and my thought process. It has helped me to weave my strings to fly my kite to that space of silence.

The Book Launch is here!

The date – 17 September 2022, Saturday

The time – 8.30 to 9.45 pm IST (Indian Standard Time)

The venue – online on Zoom

The book – sharing my solitude, Cafe Haiku’s 5th anthology.

The program –

We will begin with a short discussion on the anthology, followed by the book launch. After which some well known haijin will read some of their work.

This will be followed by a discussion on the difficulties and strategies of not just surviving but writing haiku during covid times. At the end, we will open to any questions or comments from all those present.

Please drop us an email at “inhaikumumbai@ gmail.com” so that we can mail you the link.

If you are a subscriber we have your email so its even easier – just leave a comment below.

Please do join us in this book celebration.

The anthology is available as an ebook on Amazon. Copy this ASIN code B0B59NSWPK into the Amazon of your country to find it.

CH Showcase – Joe Sebastian

As a warm up to the book launch of our latest anthology, sharing my solitude, we asked those who submitted to write a few words about themselves and their work. Over this month we will showcase all those who shared, while we finalise the book launch which should be in mid September.

The anthology is available as an ebook on Amazon. Copy this ASIN code B0B59NSWPK into the Amazon of your country to find it.

Anthology 2022

The haijin we showcase today is Joe Sebastian

Haiku, a seventeen syllable, three line poem in its traditional form originating in Japan, evokes images mostly of the natural world. Often haunting and fleeting, to me haiku are like still photographs in words that capture an image in prose.

Earlier, I used to be charmed mainly by the beauty and musicality of nature as manifested in the splendrous flora and fauna, albeit in and with all its imperfections, impermanence and incompleteness, which to the Japanese is in and by itself a thing of beauty, imparting age, stillness and an innate wisdom in and of nature and its multifarious visible and invisible processes, causing and inviting awe and admiration.

However, writing haiku more frequently now, I feel more enriched and experienced in creating poetry out of the daily humdrum, catching finer nuances drawn from a world that feels close to our own and their interconnectedness, keeping focus on that brief moment in time, which at a particular intersection of sight and smell, touch and taste leads to a sense of sudden enlightenment-that moment of epiphany – the Aha moment, the sheer joy of being in the moment, something which we are so ingenious in not doing these days.

Earier, for instance when sitting in my lawn sipping beverage and having refreshments I used to consider inquisitive intrusions by birds/squirrels/cats/pups not to mention myriad creepy crawlies, pesky at best and generally a nuisance. I am slowly but surely beginning to understand the interconnectedness between different species in this vast ecosystem of nature and what is more, appreciate that they too are on this earthly journey albeit for varying degrees of time and intimacy and connection with us humans, teaching and reminding us crucially of two cardinal experiential truths that the supreme consciousness pulsates in all of us in more or less equal measure and hence they too are kindred souls, at least, in some respects, and secondly, the sheer transience of all our earthly lives. These two realisations have made me more empathic and even sympathetic to the wants, pain & suffering mostly inflicted by us humans on our splendrous flora & fauna so wantonly which by its logical extention lead if not fully, in substantial measure, to the all important Indian moral value of ‘Vasudhaiva Kutumbakam’ which means ‘The World is One Family’ and in practical terms means the Gandhian vision of holistic development and respect for all forms of life, non-violent conflict resolution embedded in the acceptance of non-violence both as a creed, strategy and conviction.

Now I take active part in gardening and watching and deeply appreciating each process associated with it, from preparing the soil to manuring it, to planting the seeds to de-weeding spraying organic pesticides etc and to see the seeds, germinate, grow, flower and fruit.

Similarly, instead of considering birds, squirrels etc as pesky intruders, I now have a feeding pan and waterbath for them and look forward and listen to their distinctive chirps /songs early in the mornings and they too show their affection by scurrying right up to my verandah edge for scraps fallen off the table.

In short, from a largely ‘I-me-Myself’ approach to life I am now adopting a ‘We-Ours’ – This whole world’ dimension of living in a very conscious manner as a matter of choice. My above activities and the peace and contentment I gain out of it leads me all to believe that our Maker gives us repeated chances to redeem ourselves in spite of our depredations and that he has, not fully given up on us after all, and that in essence, is perhaps the primary enrichment I have gained penning haiku.

CH Showcase – Mallika Chari

As a warm up to the book launch of our latest anthology, sharing my solitude, we asked those who submitted to write a few words about themselves and their work. Over this month we will showcase all those who shared, while we finalise the book launch which should be in mid September.

The anthology is available as an ebook on Amazon. Copy this ASIN code B0B59NSWPK into the Amazon of your country to find it.

Anthology 2022

The haijin we showcase today is Mallika Chari

Being a person who has a little knowledge about painting, this art form “haiga” satisfies both of my interests – writing and painting. I started writing haiku poems, though I was writing verses based on my paintings and vice versa.


The first haiku:


loud tides
disturbed mind
becoming silent

My first haiga was published in Daily Haiga in June 2017.

I was contributing to Haiga Online journal also. An online exhibition of my haiga was featured by HaigaOnline, in December 2019.

I love the following two works for their humour:

late night
a whistler walks
the silence

raindrops
sparrow enjoying
spa in open air

I was happy to be selected for The Golden Triangle, March 2021.

among fluttering pages
my search for
the bookmark

I personally love these two, as they occured to me quite spontaneously:


paddy field
the wet soil holds
the folk songi

potted plant
the lonely child looks for
sunshine

Thus, on the long way to go on this poetic path, I keep educating myself by reading haiku journals and I wonder how easily the poets captures simple acts of nature in a poem with the simplest words.

Haiku and Haiga credits – loud tides was first published Wild Plum journal 2017, late night in Chrysanthemum 29, 2021, raindrops in Haiga online, Autumn 2017, paddy field in Prune Juice November 2020, potted plant in tsuri-doro #8 March April 2022.

CH Showcase – Aanchal Broca Kumar

As a warm up to the book launch of our latest anthology, sharing my solitude, we asked those who submitted to write a few words about themselves and their work. Over this month we will showcase all those who shared, while we finalise the book launch which should be in mid September.

The anthology is available as an ebook on Amazon. Copy this ASIN code B0B59NSWPK into the Amazon of your country to find it.

Anthology 2022

The haijin we showcase today is Aanchal Broca Kumar

I have always been writing. I write when I’m happy, I write when I’m sad and I write when I am in between happy and sad. I like to express myself on paper and while doing that I have no control over the words than come pouring out. My sentences are long and winding and go on and on. My paragraphs are badly structured and one juts into the other. After I finish, when I read what I’ve written, its often just a lot of words ….the meaning often lost in the jumble. That’s where I was as writer when Haiku came into my life.


I was fascinated by a 3 line poem I read somewhere. In 17 words, that poem expressed a feeling so beautifully and articulately that was blown away. I read a few haiku and tried to understand how to write them. It was a form of writing so different from my own and so exquisite that I wanted to learn it. I attended a 3 day workshop on Haikai and got to know the basics of haiku, senryu and tanka. This was 5 years ago. Today I’m still learning to write haiku. When I do manage to pen one down, the satisfaction that I get is heady. I have learnt that brevity can be very effective. Rather than rambling on, if one choses one’s words carefully, one can convey a message rather effectively and also aesthetically. I find myself thinking about not only what I write, but also what I say. A quality that I realise I was deficient in.


Something else that Haikai has given me is the realisation that one can soak in and appreciate beauty only when one lives in the moment. I realise that to capture the essence of anything, one has to single-mindedly observe. If your mind is at ten places and you have thoughts circling it, you will never be able to write a haiku. And I have been there. I now have found a way to ensure that I get those 3 lines right. I have set aside sometime in the mornings when I shut my eye and disengage. That’s when I can write haiku. Like most haijan, I am very inspired by nature and when I am on my morning walks, I find myself observing nature around me and more often than not, the idea for a haiku germinates in my mind. This process is almost cathartic. Its akin to meditation – at least for me.


Besides nature, most of my haiku comes from experiences close to my heart. I write a lot about my childhood and places where I grew up. My family features a lot in my poems too. Two people about whom I write most are my daughter and my grandmother. When I close my eyes and try to feel….I see them most often and so they are the stars of my haiku.


I want to continue this beautiful journey I’m on so that I can enjoy the sense of calm and beauty it brings me.

CH Showcase – Neena Singh

As a warm up to the book launch of our latest anthology, sharing my solitude, we asked those who submitted to write a few words about themselves and their work. Over this month we will showcase all those who shared, while we finalise the book launch which should be around mid September.

The anthology is available as an ebook on Amazon. Copy this ASIN code B0B59NSWPK into the Amazon of your country to find it.

Anthology 2022

The haijin we showcase today is Neena Singh

My haikai journey

The intricacies of haiku were a mystery to me though I did write 3 line poems. Then through divine serendipity in May 2016, Angelee Deodhar came into my life—a celebrated haiku poet who became my mentor, friend & haiku guru. 

Life became imbued with the timeless beauty of haiku. The abiding love for Nature, long walks in gardens, moon-gazing, and the vignettes of daily life, all spoke to me and I started penning and sharing haiku with family, friends, and online journals. Studying the works of old haiku masters, and contemporary poets as also online mentoring by The Haiku Foundation helped me understand the nuances of haiku and other forms of Japanese poetry.  A visit to Japan, the birthplace of haiku and initiation into Soka Gakkai Buddhism further inspired me. Writing haiku, and capturing a moment in time, helped me become more present and mindful. 

It is often said that when a student is ready, the teacher appears. Facebook introduced me to Kala Ramesh, creator of Triveni and she invited me to become a member of the Triveni group of talented poets. Dr Pravat Kumar Padhy— a renowned haijin, became my online mentor and friend. This journey continues and with the Gurukulam mentoring project initiated by Kala Ramesh last year, the pace of learning became more intense with Vandana Parashar, Mentor & other talented poets in the group.

Haikai has filled my life with new energy and I am writing and experimenting with its many forms—haiku, senryu, tanka, tanka prose, haibun, haiga, cherita, and recently rengay, often composing them on my walks in gardens, travels within India & abroad, and photographing trees, birds, flowers, animals & other natural wonders. Haikai has become an integral part of my life and my ikigai.

After three decades of a corporate banking career, haiku has enriched my life and forged a deeper connection to the magical universe we breathe in. Leading a simple uncluttered life based on the principles of Zen, I am at peace with myself and the world. I am grateful to the universe for such moments of enlightenment — the awareness, the insights and the awakening that inspire my poetry.

My work has been featured in online journals and magazines viz. The Heron’s Nest, Frogpond, Modern Haiku, The HaikuFoundation, Presence, Contemporary Haibun Online, Cafe haiku, Asahi, Under the Basho, Prune Juice, Chrysanthemum, Wales Haiku Journal, Acorn, Akitsu, is/let, Cold Moon, Failed Haiku, Haikuniverse, Heliosparrow, PoetryPea, Drifting Sands, Bamboo Hut, Daily haiga, Mamba Journal, cherita and others. The Editors of these journals have played an important role in shaping and polishing my work with their generous guidance. I am beholden to them and my mentors. 

I have self-published two books of poetry—”Whispers of the Soul-The Journey Within” and “One Breath Poetry”. I live in Chandigarh, the “City Beautiful“ a Union Territory of North India with my husband Prithpal and beloved yellow labrador Rumi who teaches me the joy of simply being. 

CH Showcase – Douglas J. Lanzo

As a warm up to the book launch of our latest anthology, sharing my solitude, we asked those who submitted to write a few words about themselves and their work. Over this month we will showcase all those who shared, while we finalise the book launch which should be around mid September.

The anthology is available as an ebook on Amazon. Copy this ASIN code B0B59NSWPK into the Amazon of your country to find it.

Anthology 2022

The haijin we showcase today is Douglas J. Lanzo

My haiku journey began quite recently but has been incredibly rewarding ever since.  I did not even know precisely what a haiku was until the spring of 2020, when the Pandemic inspired me to share my voice as a poet and a novelist with the world. I purchased a copy of The Haiku Handbook by William J. Higginson and Penny Harter and the rest is history.

I subsequently composed my first haiku on April 15, 2020 and submitted my first haiku to a haiku literary journal in May of 2020.  By the summer of 2020, my haiku had been accepted for publication by FrogpondBetter than StarbucksWales Haiku JournalPlum Tree TavernBear Creek HaikuLyrical Passion Poetry E-Zine and The Zen Space, being featured in its Summer Showcase. By the summer, I had even been named a runner-up in the 17 Best Haiku of 2020 Contest sponsored by the Classical Society of Poets. And this was just the beginning of my haiku awakening. 

Renowned haiku poet Scott Mason graciously offered me guidance and gently informed me after my first submission to The Heron’s Nest that “haikus”, contrary to my and Jack Kerouac’s understanding, was not the proper pluralization of haiku. After I devoured The Wonder Code, Scott’s outstanding book about how the everyday wonder all around us is captured in haiku, he generously sent me a complimentary copy of Gratitude in the Time of COVID-19The Haiku Hecameron, which I equally devoured.  His encouragement and support have powerfully impacted my writing, inspiring me to share my haiku across the globe.

As a result, I have published over 150 haiku, senryū and tanka in the United States, Canada, England, Wales, Austria, India, Australia and Japan, including in two poetry anthologies and one of the largest print publications in the world. 

A few of my favorite haiku and senryu that I have authored are:

kids’ first snorkel
expanding their world
by seventy percent

Zen experience
nothing
to explain

a passion
in the nightingale’s song
the evening she passed

yesterday’s paper
lines homeless man’s dreams
with what could have been

My favorite classical haiku poet is Bashō and among my favorite modern haiku authors are: John Barlow, Brad Bennett, Barrie Levine, Kristen Lindquist, Scott Mason, Tom Painting, Bryan Rickert, Chad Lee Robinson, Alan Summers and Michael Dylan Welch.


Although my history of composing haiku is very short, I am happy to offer a couple of thoughts for whatever they are worth.  I do believe that the quality and breadth of our haiku benefit from a close observation of nature, which is quite intricate and wondrous.  While haiku does not always have to be based on actual observation, having an adequate understanding of the nature that we depict in our haiku deepens and enriches the meaning and intuition that can be drawn from our haiku.  It is equally important in my mind to avoid placing a superficial gloss upon nature and to eschew viewing it as just another required element of a haiku. 

Nature is magical, stunning, complex, nuanced and constantly evolving.  It behooves us to take the time to draw out its wonder and appreciate its beauty, symbiosis, competition and interrelationships that enhance our lives each and every day, directly and indirectly, around the world.  I sincerely hope that we will not “modernize” haiku to the point of removing the magic of nature from it.   

I have been blessed to have had 245 poems published in 45 journals and 5 anthologies since 2020 spanning 10 countries on 5 continents, including the U.S., Austria, England, Wales, Canada, Australia, India, Japan, Mauritius and The Caribbean.

It is an honor to be included in Café Haiku’s anthology, Sharing My Solitude and to have the opportunity to share my haiku and senryū with you. 

A featured and award-winning poet and novelist , Doug’s debut novel, The Year of the Bear, has been endorsed by a New York Times bestselling author and will be released for international publication this fall. 245 of Doug’s formal, free verse, haiku, senryu and tanka poetry have found homes since 2020 in 45 literary journals and 5 poetry anthologies across the United States, Canada, England, Wales, Austria, India, Australia, Japan, Mauritius and The Caribbean.  Doug resides in Chevy Chase, Maryland with his wife and 13-year old identical twin boys, fellow internationally published haiku poets who likewise enjoy nature, hiking, tennis and chess. Doug’s author website with pre-order information for his novel is available at www.douglaslanzo.com and he welcomes you to follow him on Instagram.

Haiku credits – kids first snorkel was first published in Red Eft Review, 2020, Zen experience in Chrysanthemum Issue 29, Spring 2021, a passion in Bamboo Hut, Issue 1 of 2021, yesterdays paper in Cold Moon Journal on November 2021.