Hatsuyuki

This set of haiku emerges from a prompt given to IN haiku members.

I read on the BBC website that it has snowed in Tokyo in November for the first time since 1968. The article led me to learn this very beautiful Japanese word:

hatsuyuki (first snow)

Here are some responses to the exercise prompt using this kigo.

*

hatsuyuki —
our amicable divorce
now two years old

~ Raamesh Gowri Raghavan

*

hatsuyuki
on zoom lens … I find
my singing heart

~ Kala Ramesh

*

hatsuyuki-
her little fingers
make mom shiver

~ Rajeshwari Srinivasan

*

hatsuyuki…
my mind drifting back
with the flakes

~ Gautam Nadkarni

*

first snowfall
icing on chocolate
cake

~ Kumarendra Mallick

*

hatsuyuki
my daughter introduces me
to her intended

~ Madhuri Maitra

*

hatsuyuki —
the white bougainvilleas
that rained last night

~ Raamesh Gowri Raghavan

*

first snowfall
the milk
boils over

~ Alaka Yeravadekar

*

hatsuyuki…
bright are cancer cells under
the microscope

~ Seshu Chamarthy

*

Then Ajaya Mahala explained the Kashmiri word for hatsuyuki, nausheen. So I wrote a ku for that too!

nausheen
… I forget to ask
her name

~ Raamesh Gowri Raghavan

*

decorating the trees
on these festive days
hatsuyuki…

~ Purushothamaro Ravela

*

first snow the sudden urge to touch every rosebud sunrise

~ Samar Ghose

*

rising moon
snow-capped Kanchenjunga floats
above it all

~ Johannes Manjrekar

*

Christmas morning-
the children wake up
to hatsuyuki

~ Sandra Martyres

*

Hatsuyuki

first snow
the road to the graveyard
not yet closed

~ Ajaya Mahala

*

Her face brightens
after the blood transfusion
first snow spreads fast….

~ Purushothamaro Ravela

*

hatsuyuki
I try to catch a flake
on my tongue

~ Anitha Varma

*

hatsuyuki —
shower of soft
music

~ Kumarendra Mallick

*

Hatsuyuki
all the premises and lawn
glisten in silver sheen..

~ Purushothamaro Ravela

*

And Geethanjali Rajan has the last word: Japanese language has many such words. First snow, first thunder (of the year), first rain of autumn, first frost, first visit to the temple on new year. Beautiful.:)

Something to read on hatsuyuki from world kigo database by Gabi san.

hatsu yuki ni kizo no taimatsu no hokori kana

in first snow
last night’s pine torch
remnant

~ Kobayashi Issa

Issa uses the word hokori (“dust”) in its older sense as “remnant”: in the new-fallen snow he sees the charred remains of last night’s torch. A nice example of both juxtaposition and seasonal mood in haiku.

 

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Diwali, the Festival of Lights

Diwali, a time of oil lamps and fireworks, sweets and festivities. What better time for Cafe haiku to put together a Diwali post, with photos and haiku.

So, here we are, with the last big festival of the season.

Sandra Martyres

diwali-1-sandra
a single diya
lights up the widow’s home-
Diwali-eve

Lakshmi puja –
the lure of ladoos
keeps the child awake

the street child’s face glows
more than the sparkler he holds-
Diwali treats

drowned by the sound
of bursting crackers-
the pujari’s chants

swinging lanterns-
even the winds celebrate
Diwali

sweet bonanza –
no weight-watching
at Diwali

***

Mahrukh Balsara

late morning
one of the diyas
still burning

Diwali sweets –
she picks out
the brightest pink
***

Gautam Nadkarni
Diwali night—
the blind man’s face
lights up

Laxmi pooja—
the shadows dancing
on the walls

mantra chanting—
the young mother stifles
her son’s yawn

***

Paresh Tiwari
clay lamps …
one by one the stars
snuff out

whistling cracker
my son packs away
his crayons

***

Brijesh Raj

diwali-1-brijesh

 

Diwali night
the gentle sway
of kandeel tails

Diwali week
pushing away her
nth sweet

morning after
the ashen face
of Marine Drive skies

bottle rocket
the cyclist peddles
faster

***

Raamesh Gowri Raghavan

Diwali cleaning …
grandmother throws away
her wedding saree

neighbour’s rangoli
Rorschach blots
of a broken house

cracker bursting…
my dogs tail between his legs
below the bed

***

diwali-rohini
Rohini Gupta

***

Anitha Varma

new moon night…
a stray breeze teases
the diwali lamps
Deepavali –
pirouetting stars
outdo the diyas

***

Akila G.

Diwali sale-
the sugar-free counter
reads out of stock

the night
after fireworks
crickets

Diwali-
so many shooting stars
to make a wish

***

And, finally, a haiku which does not deal with Diwali but with another festival from the other side of the globe.

D. Holmes

a pumpkin’s grin
by candlelight… the sound
of children’s laughter

Goubou, Georgia, USA